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Phospholipid-induced Monomerization and Signal-peptide-induced Oligomerization of SecA

Domenii publicaţii > Biologie + Tipuri publicaţii > Articol în revistã ştiinţificã

Autori: Jordi Benach, Yi-Te Chou, John J. Fak, Anna Itkin, Daita D. Nicolae, Paul C. Smith, Guenther Wittrock, Daniel L. Floyd, Cyrus M. Golsaz, Lila M. Gierasch, and John F. Hunt

Editorial: Journal of Biological Chemistry, 278 (6), p.3628-3638, 2003.

Rezumat:

The SecA ATPase drives the processive translocation of the N terminus of secreted proteins through the cytoplasmic membrane in eubacteria via cycles of binding and release from the SecYEG translocon coupled to ATP turnover. SecA forms a physiological dimer with a dissociation constant that has previously been shown to vary with temperature and ionic strength. We now present data showing that the oligomeric state of SecA in solution is altered by ligands that it interacts with during protein translocation. Analytical ultracentrifugation, chemical cross-linking, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the physiological dimer of SecA is monomerized by long-chain phospholipid analogues. Addition of wild-type but not mutant signal sequence peptide to these SecA monomers redimerizes the protein. Physiological dimers of SecA do not change their oligomeric state when they bind signal sequence peptide in the compact, low temperature conformational state but polymerize when they bind the peptide in the domain-dissociated, high-temperature conformational state that interacts with SecYEG. This last result shows that, at least under some conditions, signal peptide interactions drive formation of new intermolecular contacts distinct from those stabilizing the physiological dimer. The observations that signal peptides promote conformationally specific oligomerization of SecA while phospholipids promote subunit dissociation suggest that the oligomeric state of SecA could change dynamically during the protein translocation reaction. Cycles of SecA subunit recruitment and dissociation could potentially be employed to achieve processivity in polypeptide transport.

Cuvinte cheie: SecA; protein translocation; ATPase; phospholipid; signal peptide; oligomeric state.

URL: http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/full/278/6/3628